Home Office Help

co-working

Co-working Cost Analysis: Is Renting Workspace Really Worth It?

Do co-working spaces benefit telecommuters? It depends. If you’re a work-at-home professional and curious about co-working spaces, consider the pros and cons before committing to renting workspace.

Co-working Cost Analysis: Is Renting Workspace Really Worth It?

co-working

 

The Global Coworking Unconference Conference (GCUC) team predicts that there will be 5.1 million co-workers by 2022. Freelancers, startups, and small businesses flock to co-working spaces to save money, collaborate, and cultivate a contemporary work culture.

Co-working spaces range from traditional office buildings with standard tables and desks to converted warehouses with swanky furniture and amenities. Some places include meditation rooms, yoga classes, coffee bars, in-house delis, libraries, beer taps, locker rooms, napping cots, and state-of-the-art technology.

Though co-working is an attractive option, it doesn’t benefit everyone. Here’s an analysis of the some of the major advantages and disadvantages of co-working environments for work-at-home professionals.

Related: 4 Cool Co-working Spaces You Won’t Believe!

Co-working Benefits

People who like collaborating and spending time with creative professionals tend to get the most out of co-working spaces. Here are a few of the benefits that co-working provides:

Accountability

Having people around while you work can help you stay productive. You’re less likely to slack off when you know someone is watching you. If you’re a regular, others will notice when you’re gone, so you might feel a little bit of pressure to show up consistently.

Energy

Certain types of people have contagious energy, which can boost your enthusiasm. Since co-working spaces tend to attract creatives, innovators, and entrepreneurs, it’s possible that some of their inspiration will rub off on you.

Professionalism

Sometimes going to a dedicated work environment makes you feel more professional or official. You’re forced to comb your hair and act more professionally than you would around your family or roommates.

Resources

Co-working spaces usually provide printers, copiers, and fax machines, which you may not have at home. You also get to network with techies who may be able to help you troubleshoot software issues or show you how to use an app.

Fewer Home-Based Distractions

In co-working spaces, there are no kids running around, no chocolate cookies or left-over dinners taunting you from the kitchen, and no beds tempting you to take a nap. Since you don’t have the usual distractions from home, you may be more productive.

Tax Advantages

You may be able to deduct the money you spend on your desk, mileage, and other work-related expenses from your taxes. Since a co-working space is separate from your home, it may be easier to prove that certain expenses are solely for work.

Co-working Challenges

Co-working isn’t ideal for all telecommuters and work styles. Here are some common challenges that telecommuting co-workers face:

Travel

The point of working from home is to earn back time spent driving to and from work every day. By joining a co-working community, you reintroduce the daily commute, which may be counterproductive.

Cost

You end up spending more money to work than you would by staying home. Desk space, gas, and going to lunch add up and take away from your profits.

More Environmental Distractions

Though you don’t have typical home distractions, people may conference or talk loudly in and around your workspace. You could find yourself networking or chitchatting more than being productive.

Discomfort

You might not get a desk or workspace that fits your body well. Plus, you might not be allowed to modify the space to make it more ergonomic.

Privacy

Unless you pay for an enclosed office, you won’t get much privacy. Workspaces are usually open concept to encourage collaboration.

Security

You can usually leave computers, notebooks, and other supplies when you pay for a permanent desk. However, you’re responsible for the security of anything you store in the space. Also, co-workers share Wi-Fi connections, so sensitive data may not be private.

Co-working Plans

Co-working spaces offer options to accommodate travelers, residents, and different work styles. Most companies offer the following co-working plans:

Monthly

Monthly membership is useful for professionals who truly miss the office or cannot concentrate at home. It’s also good for startups, teams, and projects that require collaboration.

Weekly

Weekly membership is perfect for telecommuters who travel for work or with family for an extended time. It’s also helpful during busy times, such as tax season or end of the fiscal year.

Daily

Daily drop-in rates are for freelancers, travelers, and consultants who need space to meet clients or hold meetings. Professionals who would otherwise work at a coffee shop can hang their hat without putting out other customers. Daily drop-ins are also great for telecommuters who just feel like being around other people.

Plans sometimes include access to or discounts on private meeting rooms usually equipped with a monitor, audio equipment, and audio and video connectors.

Co-working Average Costs

The cost of renting co-working space depends on the company, city, and amenities provided. Deskwanted performed a cost analysis of co-working spaces around the U.S. and reported the following average costs:

  • $387 per month for a dedicated desk with 24/7 access
  • $308 per month for a dedicated desk during business hours
  • $195 per month for a flexible desk during business hours
  • $209 per month for a flexible desk with 24/7 access
  • $59 per week for drop-ins
  • $23 per day for drop-ins

To put costs in perspective, some companies claim co-working costs the equivalent of two cups of coffee per day. That comparison applies only to longer-term memberships, not daily drop-in rates. 

A 2017 Global Coworking Survey found that about 40% of co-workers use their space or membership every day, while about 30% co-work three or four times per week. Thus, the longer you commit to co-working, the cheaper it is per day, so long as you actually go.

Co-working Alternatives

If you’re not sure whether co-working is right for you, here are some alternatives to try:

Local Library

The library is free, quiet, and has lots of reference materials. However, Wi-Fi is public, the work environment can be uncomfortable or distracting, and the building may not be open during your preferred work hours.

Coffee Shop

Coffee shops offer drinks and snacks, background noise, and jazzy music, and they can be a fun, energizing work scene. However, Wi-Fi is public, you may not get a table, it might be too loud to concentrate, and you have to spend money to be there.

Public Beach or Park

Working outside at public beaches or parks can be peaceful and give you the space and serenity you need to concentrate. However, these spaces usually no public Wi-Fi or electrical outlets.

You may not find a picnic table or comfortable place to work, and you might end up co-working with the mosquitoes, flies, and ants. Also, laptops shouldn’t bake in the sun too long or be exposed to sand and dirt.

Rent an Office

If you really miss the office, you can always rent your own private space. You can organize it however you wish, wear whatever you want while you’re there, set up a

secure Internet connection, and leave all your equipment and documents there. You can basically treat it as your home office away from home with a separate mailing address and lots of tax advantages. However, you end up spending a good chunk of change on rent, utilities, furniture, supplies, and the daily commute. Plus, you might have to lock yourself into a one-year lease, which may be too long of a commitment, especially if you don’t to work every day.

Share Office Space with Other Telecommuters

If you know other telecommuters in your area, you can split the cost of an office and assign each person work days and hours so that there’s no overlap. However, you may run into conflicts if your fellow officemates want to spend more time in the space while you’re working. You also run the risk of someone backing out and leaving you with all the bills.

Go to a Neighbor’s House

Do you have a friendly neighbor or family member who lives in close proximity? Ask if you can work there on occasion. Offer to get the mail, water the plants, or chip in on utilities.

It may seem strange at first, but this arrangement minimizes the commute and lets you work in a different space. However, make sure you close the door or have a quiet area to work. Otherwise, it’s no different than working in your own home.

Convert a Closet into an Office

If you don’t have room for a full office in your home, consider converting a closet into a functional workspace. You can install a desk with shelving and wheel a chair in and out during work hours. Plus, you can close the closet door when you clock out to better separate work from home. However, you still might not get the privacy you need or be free of distractions.

Related: Easy Telecommute Tips for Launching a Successful Career

Is There Really No Place Like Home?

Working from home can be challenging, especially when you have a big family or small space. You may also feel disconnected at times if you do most of your work independently. It’s nice to get out once in a while, but the cost of working from a separate location may be counter to your telecommuting goals.

Think about what’s most important to you and whether having a separate workspace away from home is beneficial. Then, make a list of all the potential places to work in your area.

Consider a hybrid strategy, where you visit a co-working space when you have a complex project that requires intense concentration. On lighter days, when you get cabin fever and just need be around other people, consider a coffee shop or the library. If all you need to do is catch up on emails one afternoon, go to a nearby park and bring a picnic.

Just remember that when the weather is bad, you’re feeling sick, or you need to wait for the plumber to fix your drains, you have the luxury to work from the comfort of your own home.

Have you tried co-working? Was renting workspace worth the cost? Tell us about your co-working experience when you connect with Virtual Vocations on Facebook and Twitter. We’d love to hear from you! 

Photo Credits: 1. iStock.com/izusek; 2. iStock.com/NakoPhotography


VVlogoJoining Virtual Vocations grants you access to our hand-picked telecommuting jobs database. Our family-owned company is committed to helping you find quality job leads. We strive to help make your work-at-home job search faster, easier and safer by bringing you scam-free jobs that offer some form of telecommuting or virtual work.

Learn how our service works, browse job leads by location and career category, or search hundreds of hand-screened telecommuting jobs to find legitimate work-at-home job leads that match your skills and background.

Register for free or contact us for more information on our service guarantee. We look forward to hearing from you!

organization hacks

Organization Hacks: 20 Tips for Remote Professionals

One of the hardest parts of starting a new remote career is finding your organizational grove. With so much flexibility and no hard limit on office supplies in your own space, Virtual Vocations offers 20 organization hacks to help you be your best self while you work.

20 Organization Hacks for Remote Professionals

organization hacks

When you first set out to work virtually, the excitement can make it easy to stick to a strict schedule. However, as the months progress and you get more relaxed, your once tidy desk can start to pile with paperwork. As the volume of contracts, invoices, files, and emails grow, your anxiety level can rise along with it.

Here are 20 organization hacks to help you escape the clutter cycle and stay on top of your game.

1. Get a Personal Assistant App

There are a variety of no-cost apps you can use to help free up the mental clutter of remembering tasks, events and more. Making your hectic day much less stressful, personal assistant apps help collect your daily information as well as other information stored on your phone, email, and within documents.

Related: 14 Free and Low-Cost Software Tools for Remote Teams

Prepare ahead of time for a meeting by getting a reminder to start working on your presentation or be aware of the weather in case you usually work outside and need to work from a different location. Some assistant apps even use your habits to adapt how they respond to requests and what information is collected. Regardless if you are team Android or iOS, you can find a helpful assistant to help keep organized.

2. Create Your Own Desk Calendar

Technology isn’t the only way to stay organized on a daily basis. If you like to express your DIY side, you can create a simple desk calendar for major events and deadlines so that you never miss an important date.

Use an extra large sticky note and draw a calendar using a ruler to create the lines. You can mark each day or simply indicate the start of the week. Incorporate stickers and markers to highlight what matters most you. If you want to take your calendar creation to the next level, consider creating a bullet journal.

3. Use Google Calendar

If digital solutions are more your style, you can use Google Calendar to create a comprehensive planner. Not only does Google Calendar come with notifications and reminders, you can use different colors to indicate various event types to further add to your organizational strategy.

4. Re-Organize Your Files

If you’ve had a home office for more than a year, you probably have an array of files spread across different folders. There may even be a document or two hiding under a notebook on your desk. It is easy to misplace an important document if you don’t review your files at regular interviews.

At least every three months, take some time to go through your paper document files and be sure that your current system is still working for you.

Cut down on confusion by creating a new filing system to keep your documents secure. You can move your file cabinet to a new location or re-label your file categories to better fit how they are being used at the current stage of your career.

5. Create a Digital Filing System

Along with a physical filing system, the documents stored on your computer should also be organized in a logical manner. Often multiple versions of the same document can add disorder to your digital system.

Cleanse your Word documents, PDFs, and Excel sheets by creating easy to understand categories and pathways to get access to your frequently used documents. For more technology perfect for your home office, we outlined a list of the best tools to help you stay productive once you get organized.

organization hacks

6. Organize Cables and Wires

When working remotely, the sheer number of wires, cords, and devices at and around your desk can add a level of chaos to any home office. A simple way to reduce wire clutter is to use a cable organizer and hide your cables under your desk. If you find your current cords are too short, invest in a surge protector with a good amount of space to plug in all your necessities.

7. Invest in a Rolling Cart

If you are short on space, utilize the area you do have to its best ability. Consider purchasing a rolling cart for your files and supplies. You can organize this cart as you would a stationary filing cabinet and move it out of the way after your workday.

An additional benefit of the mobile filing cabinet is that you can easily access the items you need during the day by moving it quickly, saving you the need to travel back and forth to retrieve individual files.

8. Get a Monitor Stand

As you work during the day, it is easy to begin to slump, putting pressure on your back and neck. This stress on your physical body can reduce your productivity and make any quest for organization obsolete. Additionally, having your monitor up higher leaves more room on your desk. Clear space is a great way to promote calm while you work.

9. Get a Keyboard and Wrist Rest

Along the same comfort lines, a keyboard and wrist rest can help prevent strain on your hands and wrists so you can work longer.

Organization is as much a mental strategy as it is a physical practice.

Invest in items for your home office that assist you in feeling positive about your work. Having pain-free wrists and hands is a great start to overall comfort when telecommuting.

10. Create a Privacy Curtain

Just because you have a small office area doesn’t mean you can’t create the perfect space. If you cannot entirely rid yourself of clutter, you can mask it to help your space look and feel more spacious, open, and organized.

Privacy curtains can be hung from your ceiling and drawn down while you work to cover a bookshelf or other items that share your live-in office space. You can also use a folding screen divider or make your own divider using sheer paper or fabric.

organization hacks

11.Try Woven Baskets

If the idea of too many boxes and bins is not your idea of a peaceful work environment, try out assorted baskets you can place under your desk to hide clutter and keep essentials such as pens, staples, tabs, and rubberbands neatly stored. Baskets also add a nice design aspect to any plain office space, displaying your unique personality and sense of style while keeping you organized.

12. Color Code

Color is a powerful tool for organization. It can assist you in remembering important tasks and form associations that create pathways in your brain for long-term memory storage.

Studies show that color coding can enhance memory recall and increase performance. Complementary colors help us differentiate things, whereas monochromatic colors help form categories. In your office space, use color coding to better assemble your workstation. Tabs in particular colors can help you easily find subcategories.

13. Use a Physical Inbox

Do you receive both professional and personal mail at your home address? You’ll want to be sure to separate the packages, labels, and mail you receive for work from the mail associated with your home life.

Use a small inbox to keep track of what items you need to mail and what items you need to review. Be sure to create a limit for the amount of time an item can sit in the inbox. Clearing the box at least once a week is a great way to keep it clear of too much excess.

14. Utilize Email Filters

Your physical mailbox is not the only mail home that can use an organizational boost. As email pours in throughout your day, an important message could be buried in minutes. Never miss a vital message by applying labels and filters to your inbox.

You can automatically place mail from particular people or with specific subjects in an appropriate folder to be reviewed. Junk mail and nonessential emails can be placed in their own folder to be deleted regularly. Email is a powerful tool when used to its full potential. Review your email settings to find a way to optimize its use.

15. Invest in a Scanner

One way to reduce clutter in your home office is to reduce the number of paper files you use. Aside from legal and financial documents of which you may need physical copies, files can be digitized and stored on your computer or within cloud software.

You use your scanner to create PDFs of documents and assign them to folders. You can also scan notes to get rid of old notebooks.

organization hacks

16. Get a Shredder

Once you’ve made use of your scanner, you can shred the unneeded documents and recycle the paper. It is a great practice to shred documents you don’t need each week, not only for organization, but also for security. The paper can be reused and your office space can maintain its shine.

17. Use a Time Mapping App

Free productivity apps can assist you with organizing your day, keeping track of how much time you spend on daily activities, and encouraging you to focus on a single task.

Apps such as Focus Booster help you block out distractions and get down to work, while Toggl helps you track your speed and productivity over time and delivers weekly reports to help you continue to improve.

18. Rely on a Digital Budget Sheet

As a work from home employee or contractor, it is up to you to track your expenses. Many mobile banking apps include a feature that maps your monthly spending. If your bank doesn’t support this feature, you can download an app that assists in tracking weekly, monthly, and quarterly spending so you can better organize your finances for tax season.

19. Use a Milage Counter

If you travel for your job, you should keep track of the miles you are racking up on your car. You can use an app or an in-car device to measure each work-related trip and log miles, distance and the nature of the trip. This will save you the hassle of weeding through receipts to attempt to put all the data together when you need it.

20. Consider a Meal Planner or Meal Delivery Service

Health should still be a major priority even when working remotely. At times when you work from home, going grocery shopping after a long day can seem impossible. Reduce the stress of healthy eating by planning out your meals by the week or by month. You can purchase unperishable items to last the entire month and then shop for fruits, veggies, and other fresh items each week.

Related: Meal Delivery Services: 10 Options for Busy Telecommuters

There are also a variety of food prep services that will deliver fully prepared meals or ingredients for meals right to your door. If you have mobility issues or struggle with finding time or inspiration to cook, these options will allow you to still get your recommended daily nutrients without becoming exhausted.

Get Organized Today

Remote work is a lifestyle. The more you invest in finding the organization hacks that work for you, the better your work from home life will be. Every organization tip, trick or strategy won’t be perfect for you, so experiment with suggestions until you define a strategy that helps you feel empowered and in control of your time.

Do you have additional telecommuting organization hacks? Tell us your advice when you connect with Virtual Vocations on Facebook and Twitter. We’d love to hear from you! 

Photo Credits: 1. iStock.com/Oko_SwanOmurphy; 2. iStock.com/XiXinXing; 3. iStock.com/jfairone; 4. iStock.com/baona


VVlogoJoining Virtual Vocations grants you access to our hand-picked telecommuting jobs database. Our family-owned company is committed to helping you find quality job leads. We strive to help make your work-at-home job search faster, easier and safer by bringing you scam-free jobs that offer some form of telecommuting or virtual work.

Learn how our service works, browse job leads by location and career category, or search hundreds of hand-screened telecommuting jobs to find legitimate work-at-home job leads that match your skills and background.

Register for free or contact us for more information on our service guarantee. We look forward to hearing from you!

home office

Finding Spare Space for Your Home Office

Concerned that you don’t have enough space in your home for a home office? We’re showing you where to find the spare space you need. 

Under the stairs. The recess under your stairs is an underutilized home office gem. Outfit the space with shelves and drawers, a smooth desk top, and an ergonomical chair and you’ll be on your way to achieving a productive work-at-home lifestyle in no time!

Spare bedroom. For many telecommuters, having an entire room available to devote to a home office is a luxury. If you are one of the lucky ones with a bedroom to spare, capitalize on this space for a high-function, private home office. Keep in mind that a home office with a locking door is often an essential requirement for consideration in remote case management, nursing, and administrative work where confidentiality is a top priority.

Closet. If you don’t have an extra bedroom to spare for a work space, convert a hall or bedroom closet into a home office. This home office location is ideal for telecommuters living in tight spaces because they can close the closet door when their work day is done; out of site, out of mind.

home office

Kitchen nook. A kitchen alcove is prime home office real estate you can fit with a desk armoire and transform into a home office. If you don’t have a kitchen alcove, consider swapping your breakfast nook for home office space, especially if you already have a dining room or eat-in kitchen.

Attic. With a few simple touches, your dusty old attic can easily be converted into a fresh, private home office oasis. Remember to properly vent your attic home office and utilize fans as needed so that your calming work oasis doesn’t turn into a desert.

Basement. Basements are a practical choice for telecommuters who need a home office but don’t have spare space to utilize upstairs. Help your basement home office feel more homey and less horror movie by adding warm personal decor, like an area rug, framed photos, and pet bed for your favorite furry friend.

home office

Garden shed. Think outside the box and consider moving your home office to the shed in your garden. You can be close to nature while you’re working. It’s the best of both worlds.

Where will you set up your own home office? Join the discussion by leaving a comment below and don’t forget to connect with us on Facebook, Twitter, Google+, and Pinterest

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VVlogoJoining Virtual Vocations grants you access to our hand-picked telecommuting jobs database. Our family-owned company is committed to helping you find quality job leads. We strive to help make your work-at-home job search faster, easier and safer by bringing you scam-free jobs that offer some form of telecommuting or virtual work.

Learn how our service works, browse job leads by location and career category, or search hundreds of hand-screened telecommuting jobs to find legitimate work-at-home job leads that match your skills and background.

Register for free or contact us for more information on our service guarantee. We look forward to hearing from you!

pet-friendly home office

Creating a Pet-Friendly Home Office

Not all telecommuters are work-at-home parents to human children; many of us are parents to fur babies who are important members of the family.

You and your pets may enjoy being together while you work, but that doesn’t mean your home office is safe for your dogs and cats. Create a pet-friendly home office environment using these helpful suggestions:

Raise your PC off the floor. If you’re sharing home office space with a dog or cat, you’re also sharing your home office with your pet’s shedding fur. Elevating your PC tower will protect its fans from fur ball clogs and prevent your pet from using it as a personal scratching post or fire hydrant.

pet-friendly home office

Consider keyboard protection. Cats love to use keyboards as their personal treadmills and nap mats. This is fun for them but not so much for you when you notice that your pet’s paws have crafted and sent a nonsensical IM to your boss or deleted an important document in the Cloud. The solution is PawSense.

PawSense is a software program that detects nonsense typed on your keyboard. Upon detection, the software will disable keyboard commands to protect your computer and play an annoying noise to deter cats from lying down on the keyboard.

Contain cables and cords. Pets are pretty much guaranteed to get tangled up in a disorganized web of cables and cords originating from your home office electronics. Contain cables and cords and keep your pets free from the threat of electrocution and strangulation by utilizing zip ties, cable clamps, or a cable management system in your home office.

Establish space just for your pets. Your dog or cat will want to be close to you, so set up a bed near or under your desk, like this one from Frontgate. If you have a small dog you could even convert a drawer or cupboard in your desk into a space for him.

Let dogs out for phone meetings. Taking an important call? Avoid embarrassing barking noises by giving your dogs some yard time while you’re on the phone. Your coworkers and clients will appreciate it.

pet-friendly home office

Make time for walks. Dog owners, build time into your day for a walk with your perfect pooch. Exercise will help keep your pet content and not constantly begging for your attention while you work.

Keep tabs on the choking hazards. Contain small items, like paper clips, pens, staples, and thumbtacks, in boxes with lids or in drawers that close and lock. When these items fall on the floor, they pose a choking risk to curious animals.

Secure toxic office supplies. In the same way that you should contain small office supplies that could cause your pet to choke, store toxic office supplies, like toner cartridges, ink, and glue, in a secure location within your home office.

Take a tour of your home office from your pet’s point of view. Take a cue from new parents baby-proofing their homes for their human infants and protect your fur babies by touring your home office from their perspective. Get down on all fours and sniff out any home office dangers. Cover electrical outlets, screw heavy shelving to the wall, and latch cabinet doors that lead to items that could harm your pets.

Do you allow pets in your home office; how do you make it work for all of you?

Do you allow pets in your home office; how do you make it work for all of you? Join the discussion by leaving a comment below and don’t forget to connect with us on Facebook, Twitter, Google+, and Pinterest

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VVlogoJoining Virtual Vocations grants you access to our hand-picked telecommuting jobs database. Our family-owned company is committed to helping you find quality job leads. We strive to help make your work-at-home job search faster, easier and safer by bringing you scam-free jobs that offer some form of telecommuting or virtual work.

Learn how our service works, browse job leads by location and career category, or search hundreds of hand-screened telecommuting jobs to find legitimate work-at-home job leads that match your skills and background.

Register for free or contact us for more information on our service guarantee. We look forward to hearing from you!

home office

4 Eco-Friendly Home Office Accessories

This Earth Day, consider incorporating these inexpensive and eco-friendly home office accessories into your home office decor to help you save some dough while saving the environment. 

home office

3-Tier Bamboo Desk Organizer. For less than $20 you can tidy up your desk with a bamboo desktop organizer from Organizeit.com. This organizer is made from renewable and eco-friendly bamboo wood and is as functional as it is stylish. The drawers and compartments are ideal for housing paperclips, pens, and notepads that could otherwise clutter your work surface.

Sugarcane Notepads. The Green Office features a two-pack of sugarcane notepads for $3.49. If you take a lot of notes, consider using a notepad that’s made from recycled materials and can also be recycled when you’ve filled up all the pages.

Modular Bookshelves. For as little as $24 you can upgrade your home office shelves for eco-friendly versions from The Ultimate Green Store. The retailer offers a wide variety of bookshelves in several colors. They are made from recycled materials and are non-toxic. Prices increase in correlation with the size of the shelving unit chosen.

home office

Staple-less Staplers. UncommonGoods can supply you with a set of two staple-less staplers for $16. With this product, there’s no need to stock up on staples that will just end up in a landfill. The staple-less stapler punches a small hole in documents, folding the flaps of the papers together so they stay secure While the staple-less stapler is an excellent eco-friendly office accessory for any telecommuter, it’s especially useful for work-at-home moms and dads with kids that like to explore their parent’s desk.

We want to hear from you! Which of these eco-friendly home office accessories is your fave? Join the discussion by leaving a comment below and don’t forget to connect with us on Facebook, Twitter, Google+, and Pinterest.

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VVlogoJoining Virtual Vocations grants you access to our hand-picked telecommuting jobs database. Our family-owned company is committed to helping you find quality job leads. We strive to help make your work-at-home job search faster, easier and safer by bringing you scam-free jobs that offer some form of telecommuting or virtual work.

Learn how our service works, browse job leads by location and career category, or search hundreds of hand-screened telecommuting jobs to find legitimate work-at-home job leads that match your skills and background.

Register for free or contact us for more information on our service guarantee. We look forward to hearing from you!

home office

Allergy Proofing Your Home Office

Our allergy proofing tips are nothing to sneeze at! 

Spring is a welcome change from winter for most of us, but if you’re a telecommuter and allergy sufferer, this can be rough time of year. Keep your body healthy so you can keep your productivity high by implementing these simple fixes to hold allergens at bay in your home office.

Keep humidity below 50%. If mold is a problem for you, controlling your home office humidity is a good idea. This is especially true for telecommuters with a home office located in a basement. We suggest keeping your home office humidity level low by utilizing a humidifier.

Close the windows. Although the cool, gentle breezes of spring are intoxicating, pollen allergy sufferers should close their windows and rely on air conditioning for a comfortable work space.

Replace your air filter. Speaking of air conditioning, regularly replacing the air filter in your central heating and air unit will clear the air and help keep your home office free of allergy aggravating dust.

Bonus tip: Place cheese cloth over your vents for an additional layer of air filtration.

Remove carpet. Swap the allergen trapping carpet in your home office for easier to clean flooring options, like tile, laminate, or hardwood. If you simply cannot live without a rug, remember to vacuum it weekly, at minimum.

We want to hear from you! Do you have additional home office allergy proofing tips? Join the discussion by leaving a comment below and don’t forget to connect with us on Facebook, Twitter, Google+, and Pinterest.

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VVlogoJoining Virtual Vocations grants you access to our hand-picked telecommuting jobs database. Our family-owned company is committed to helping you find quality job leads. We strive to help make your work-at-home job search faster, easier and safer by bringing you scam-free jobs that offer some form of telecommuting or virtual work.

Learn how our service works, browse job leads by location and career category, or search hundreds of hand-screened telecommuting jobs to find legitimate work-at-home job leads that match your skills and background.

Register for free or contact us for more information on our service guarantee. We look forward to hearing from you!

home office

What Your Home Office Color Says About You

You may have known that color influences your mood, but did you know that the color of your home office can indicate which telecommute career is your best match?

Scroll down to discover what your home office color conveys about your professional personality and your ideal telecommute job.

Red

home office

Image credit: Coastalliving.com

Telecommuter Traits: Ambitious, determined, resourceful

Telecommute Job Categories to Consider: AdministrativeManagement, Executive Level


Orange

home office

Image credit: Flynninsideout.com

Telecommuter Traits: Enthusiastic, creative, proactive

Telecommute Job Categories to Consider: Advertising, Marketing, Public Relations


Yellow

home office

Image credit: Architectureholic.com

Telecommuter Traits: Cheerful, optimistic, intelligent

Telecommute Job Categories to Consider: Customer Service, Hospitality, Travel


Green

home office

Image credit: BenjaminMoore.com

Telecommuter Traits: Balanced, self-reliant, observant

Telecommute Job Categories to Consider: Human Services, Non-ProfitAccounting


Blue

home office

Image credit: ElitDesignHome.com

Telecommuter Traits: Trustworthy, confident, loyal

Telecommute Job Categories to Consider: Account Management, Consulting, Sales


Purple

home office

Image credit: HomeMyDesign.com

Telecommuter Traits: Creative, imaginative, inspiring

Telecommute Job Categories to Consider: Creative Design, Graphic DesignWriting


Pink

home office

Image credit: HouseInspirations.com

Telecommuter Traits: Compassionate, insightful, non-threatening

Telecommute Job Categories to Consider: Customer Service, Nursing, Education


Beige

home office

Image credit: Home-Designing.com

Telecommuter Traits: Dutiful, stable, orderly

Telecommute Job Categories to Consider: Product Management, Quality AssuranceData Entry


Gray

home office

Image credit: GreenUpHouse.com

Telecommuter Traits: Responsible, practical, impartial

Telecommute Job Categories to Consider: Legal, Technical Support, Project Management


White

home office

Image credit: Home-Designing.com

Telecommuter Traits: Encouraging, protective, reflective

Telecommute Job Categories to Consider: Cyber Security, Medical-HealthTeaching

We want to hear from you! What color is your home office? Join the discussion by leaving a comment below and don’t forget to connect with us on Facebook, Twitter, Google+, and Pinterest.

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VVlogoJoining Virtual Vocations grants you access to our hand-picked telecommuting jobs database. Our family-owned company is committed to helping you find quality job leads. We strive to help make your work-at-home job search faster, easier and safer by bringing you scam-free jobs that offer some form of telecommuting or virtual work.

Learn how our service works, browse job leads by location and career category, or search hundreds of hand-screened telecommuting jobs to find legitimate work-at-home job leads that match your skills and background.

Register for free or contact us for more information on our service guarantee. We look forward to hearing from you!

home office

Home Office Homeowners Insurance Checklist

Insurance coverage is an important consideration for telecommuters, but not all insurance companies guarantee coverage when you operate a business from your home.

As a self-employed professional, the last thing you need is to be out of business because of a lawsuit, fire, natural disaster, or injury. However, according to the Insurance Information Institute, most insurance policies only cover up to $2,500 in equipment for a home-based business. Make the most of your homeowners insurance by considering this home office checklist when reviewing your current policy or before purchasing additional coverage.

Natural disasters and fire. You may need coverage for business interruptions in case of a long-term power loss or a fire to your home that prevents you from working for many days in a row. Talk to your insurance provider about the differences in traditional homeowners and commercial insurance plans, and which will provide you with the best coverage for your home business.

Coverage for “other structures.” Do you operate a home office based out of your garage, shed, or guest house? You need insurance coverage for more than just your main residence. However, it’s vital to remember that not all insurance providers consider similar alternate home office structures to be appropriate for insurance coverage; therefore, in order to get the proper coverage, you may need to switch plans or relocate your home office to your main dwelling.

Business use of your car. Partial telecommuters who use their automobile to travel for work or take clients to lunch on occasion should know that auto insurance won’t cover the loss of expensive home office equipment you leave in your vehicle. It’s best to ensure your homeowners insurance policy will cover home business equipment lost or damaged while you are on the road. The good news is some homeowners insurance policies treat your vehicle as an extension of your home, according to Farmers Insurance.

Injury insurance. If you run a business from your home, conduct meetings in your home office, or receive regular business deliveries to your residence, you could be liable if someone gets hurt on your property. Double-check that your homeowners insurance will cover injuries occurring in or around your home office, no matter how unlikely.

Exclusions to your homeowners policy that apply to your business. If you aren’t covered for a flood or an earthquake on your standard homeowners insurance policy, you can expect that your home business isn’t covered either. Additionally, you should make sure that any expensive home office equipment you want insured doesn’t exceed the limit of coverage provided by your homeowners insurance.

We want to hear from you! Is your home business insured separately or included on your homeowners insurance policy? Join the discussion by leaving a comment below and don’t forget to connect with us on Facebook, Twitter, Google+, and Pinterest.

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VVlogoVirtual Vocations is a family-owned job service committed to helping you find quality telecommute job leads. We strive to help make your work-at-home job search faster, safer and more productive by bringing you scam-free jobs that offer some form of telecommuting or virtual work.

Learn how our service works, browse job leads by location and career category, or search hundreds of hand-screened telecommuting jobs to find legitimate work-at-home job leads that match your skills and background.

Register for free or contact us for more information on our service guarantee. We look forward to hearing from you!